SUFFOLK COUNTY

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COLD WEATHER TIPS

Keep pets indoors. 

To prevent injury, frostbite and hypothermia/death.

Be alert to frostbite.

            Skin can turn red, white or gray and scaly. If you suspect your cat or dog has frostbite, contact your vet.

Keep ID tags on pets.

            More pets are lost in the winter than any other time of the year. Pets lose their ability to scent their way home in snow and ice conditions.

 Always walk dogs on a leash.

            Dogs can become disoriented or lost. Roads are often dangerous in snow conditions with snow plow piles and ice. 

Be aware of sheltered cats and wildlife:

            Outdoor cats and other animals will often seek shelter beneath the hood of a car and can be killed by fans or belts.  Please bang on the hood or blow your horn before starting the car.

 Never leave pets in the car.

Not for any length of time. Hypothermia and freezing are common in winter.

 Be aware of exposure time.

            Dogs who are ill, old, very young or short-haired cannot endure prolonged exposure to winter weather.  Take them out only to relieve themselves.  Coats or sweaters can help avoid problems for dogs who like to play in the snow.

 Keep pets dry.

            Never take your dog or cat out after a bath unless they are 100% dry.

 Have a clean up routine.

            Keep a towel and maybe moist wipes by the door to clean dog’s feet of salt, anti-freeze, and other harmful toxins. 

Road salt can irritate or burn, as well as cause vomiting and in some pets, cause seizures.  Antifreeze has a sweet, attractive smell to pets and can be deadly if ingested.  Keep paws, belly and legs clean to avoid problems. 

Keep pets warm

            Always keep beds slightly elevated and away from cold drafts. 

Keep pets safe from fire

            If using a fireplace or wood stove, put a protective barrier or fire screen to prevent burns.

            Never use a space heater if you own pets. Pets can chew on the cord and be electrocuted.  Pets can knock over or land on the space heater resulting in burns or worse, set fire to the home. 

If you keep your dog outdoors:

Provide a well-insulated dog-house. It should be free from drafts and of an adequate size.  Too large is not good.

Don’t use metal dishes – tongues can stick to frozen bowls.

Change water daily – snow is not a substitute for fresh water.  A bowl of water will freeze when temperatures drop and the pet can dehydrate.

It is not necessary to increase calories for your dog in winter unless temperatures are subzero, or the dog is under increased stress (like a sled-dog).

Anti Freeze:

·         Lethal poison- Ethylene Glycol- causes renal failure in pets.

·         A few licks is a fatal amount.

·         Has a sweet smell and taste that attracts animals.

·         Clean spills immediately – not just for your pets, but also wildlife and neighbor’s pets that visit your property.

·         Use “safe” antifreeze – Propylene Glycol*- or ask your mechanic to.

           

*Brands such as Sierra-1-800-289-7234 or StaClean 1-800-825-3464

 

Salts and Ice Melts:

·         Generally contain one of the following:  Sodium Chloride, Potassium Chloride, Magnesium Chloride, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Magnesium Acetate, Urela.

·         Symptoms of exposure can be as mild as contact burns, and progress to vomiting, diarrhea, Gastro-Intestinal distress, Ataxia, Cardiac Failure, seizures.

·         Treat by bathing the pet immediately and bring to the vet with the product package so they can apply appropriate treatment

View in PDF

Winter Tips:  As winter approaches, it is important to keep the following tips in mind:

Keep cats indoors to prevent injury, frostbite and hypothermia or death.

Be alert to frostbite—skin can turn red, white, gray or scaly. Contact your veterinarian.

Keep ID tags on pets– more pets are lost in winter than any other time of year. Pets lose their ability to scent their way home in snow and ice conditions.

Always walk dogs on a leash– Dogs can become disoriented or lost. Roads are often dangerous in snow conditions with snow plow piles and ice.

Be aware of sheltered cats and wildlife– Outdoor cats & other animals will often seek shelter beneath the hood of a car and can be killed by fans or belts. Please bang on the hood or blow your horn before starting the car.

Never leave pets in the car for any length or time. Hypothermia and freezing are common in winter.

Be aware of exposure time– Dogs who are ill, old, very young or short-haired cannot endure prolonged exposure. Take them out only to relieve themselves. Coats or sweaters can help avoid problems for dogs who like to play in the snow.

Keep pets dry– never take your dog or cat out after a bath unless they are 100% dry.

Have a cleanup routine– Keep a towel and moist wipes by the door to clean dog’s feet of salt, anti-freeze and other harmful toxins. Road salt can irritate or burn, as well as cause vomiting. Antifreeze has a sweet, attractive smell to pets and can be deadly if ingested. Keep paws, belly and legs clean.

Keep pets warm– always keep beds slightly elevated and away from cold drafts.

Keep pets safe from fire– if using a fireplace, put up a protective barrier to prevent burns.

If you keep your dog outdoors provide a well insulated dog house. Don’t use metal dishes, as tongues can stick to frozen bowls. Snow is not a substitute for fresh water!  

Dr. John Charos

HOT WEATHER TIPS FOR YOUR PET

 

Dogs and cats can suffer from the same problems that humans do in hot weather.  These health concerns include overheating, dehydration and even sunburn.  By taking some simple precautions, you can keep your animal companions healthy and happy in higher temperatures.

 

Your pet may slow down when the weather heats up, so the best time for exercise is in the early morning or evening, but never when it’s especially hot or humid.  Take care not to let your dog stand on hot asphalt, his body can heat up quickly and his sensitive paw pads can easily burn.  Owners of canines with heavy coats can help prevent them from overheating by cutting the hair to a one-inch length.  Never trim your pet’s coat to the skin, which can rob your dog of his protection from the sun.  Always provide plenty of shade and cool, clean water for animals kept outdoors.  A properly constructed doghouse is a must if you dog lives outdoors.  Bring your cat or dog inside during the hottest part of the day.  Let him rest in a cool part of the house, but first make sure there are no unscreened windows or open doors in your home through which dogs and cats can fall or escape.

 

When traveling with your pet during hot weather, make it a habit to carry a gallon – size thermos of water.  Never leave your animal alone in a vehicle.  Overheating can be fatal.  Even with the windows open, a parked automobile can quickly become a furnace.

 

And summers the time when gardens, lawn and trees are sprayed with insecticides so avoid walking your dog in suspect areas.  If you think that your animal has been exposed to dangerous chemicals or coolant leaking from an automobile, call your veterinarian.

 

Some animals will need extra special care in hot weather, especially those who are old and overweight or have heart of lung disease.  Certain breeds of dogs, including pugs, bulldogs, Boston terriers, Lhasa apsos and shih tzus, also need extra attention on hot days.  If your pet is showing signs of heat stroke or exhaustion, take him to the veterinarian immediately.

 

Make sure your pet always wears a collar and identification tag.

 

Pets need exercise even when it  hot, but extra care needs to be taken.  Limit exercise to the coolest time of the day, early morning or evening hours.

 

CONTACT

   

Suffolk County Offices
North County Complex
725 Veterans Memorial Hwy.
Bldg. 16
Hauppauge, NY 11788

Mailing address:
P.O. Box 6100
Hauppauge, NY 11788-0099

(631) 382-7722 Phone

(631) 382-4042 Fax

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